Watch ‘Satellite’ from our Austin City Limits performance - http://go.spin.com/1hkG6oa Watch the full episode this Saturday, April 5th on PBS and online at http://acltv.com/watch

Nine Inch Nails: “Disappointed” live at Staples Center, Los Angeles, 11.08.13.

Part of the feature-length HD concert film Tension, streaming free at nin.com/tension.

Nine Inch Nails: While I’m Still Here (Breyer P-Orridge ‘Howler’ Remix) from the Hesitation Marks Deluxe Edition.

Some words about the remix, taken from Genesis Breyer P-Orridge's correspondence with Trent Reznor:

Lady Jaye, my other half, we married Friday June 13th 1995, was raised from a small child by her grandmother. In 1996, whilst living happily on 10 acres of redwoods with a creek & waterfalls and no neighbours, we heard Mimi, her gran, was severely ill, with colostomy bag, unable to walk and increasingly overwhelming Alzheimers. We agreed to leave California to go to Queens and take care of Mimi 24x7. After a year or so Mimi had to go into full time care as her dementia was so out of touch with “non-sensus reality”.

When we went to work with Sean on your beautiful song he told me his grandmother had just passed away a week ago from Alzheimers and dementia!

This all felt significant, though we don’t know your story and would never ask.

We had recorded Howler monkeys at LA zoo as they woke at dawn in 1996…and kept that tape for some special project. That is what is in the background. The trumpet is a Tibetan Thighbone trumpet, 300+ years old, the thigh of a virgin once owned by Trungpa Kunley of the “crazy Path” of Buddhism. There’s also a Shiva Sadhu’s serpent shaped trumpet. Both said to destroy demons…or in Western speak, release hormones that balance mental issues.

The voice at start and end is Lady Jaye talking about MIND is the being, not the body, just before s/he dropped her body. We wanted it to all be as intimate as you implied it was.

We are proud that the remix WAS included on the deluxe package.

We hope that information helps you see the story we were trying to tell with sound. We always feel music is storytelling, psychic hygiene/healing for our chosen tribe.

Hesitation Marks interior packaging art. Details of artwork by Russell Mills photographed by Rob Sheridan.
Wallpapers coming soon… Hesitation Marks interior packaging art. Details of artwork by Russell Mills photographed by Rob Sheridan.
Wallpapers coming soon… Hesitation Marks interior packaging art. Details of artwork by Russell Mills photographed by Rob Sheridan.
Wallpapers coming soon… Hesitation Marks interior packaging art. Details of artwork by Russell Mills photographed by Rob Sheridan.
Wallpapers coming soon… Hesitation Marks interior packaging art. Details of artwork by Russell Mills photographed by Rob Sheridan.
Wallpapers coming soon… Hesitation Marks interior packaging art. Details of artwork by Russell Mills photographed by Rob Sheridan.
Wallpapers coming soon… Hesitation Marks interior packaging art. Details of artwork by Russell Mills photographed by Rob Sheridan.
Wallpapers coming soon… Hesitation Marks interior packaging art. Details of artwork by Russell Mills photographed by Rob Sheridan.
Wallpapers coming soon… Hesitation Marks interior packaging art. Details of artwork by Russell Mills photographed by Rob Sheridan.
Wallpapers coming soon… Hesitation Marks interior packaging art. Details of artwork by Russell Mills photographed by Rob Sheridan.
Wallpapers coming soon…

We have some release events happening in the Los Angeles area. Stop by Monday night to pick up the CD, deluxe CD, and vinyl of Hesitation Marks, get some food, and enter a raffle for a chance to win tickets to the private Troubadour show on September 3rd. Full details in the image.

Hesitation Marks was mastered in two different ways - the standard, “loud” mastering (which is what you’ll find on the CD, on iTunes, and everywhere else), and also an alternate “audiophile” mastering, which we’re offering as a free download option for anyone who purchases the album through nin.com. For the majority of people, the standard version will be preferable and differences will be difficult to detect. Audiophiles with high-end equipment and an understanding of the mastering process might prefer the alternate version.

Alan Moulder, who mixed the album, offers a more detailed explanation:

When we were mixing Hesitation Marks we decided to treat the mastering process in a slightly different way to the usual. Since we had tried to treat every other aspect of making this record differently to how we were used to, it seemed to make sense. We were mixing as we went along with the production of each song rather than at the end, so we thought that once we had a song pretty close we would send it off to Tom Baker, our long time serving mastering engineer, to give it some mastering treatment. Normally you wait until the record is finished being recorded and mixed, then take all the mixes to mastering. But we thought doing it again, as we went along, might make us push the process further and spend more time on mastering rather than rush through it at the end. Whilst doing this we became aware of how much low bass information there was on the record. Since that can define how loud of a level the mastering can be, we were faced with a dilemma: do we keep the bass and and have a significantly lower level record, or do we sacrifice the bass for a more competitive level of volume? The biggest issue in mastering these days tends to be how loud can you make your record. It is a fact that when listening back-to-back, loud records will come across more impressively, although in the long run what you sacrifice for that level can be quality and fidelity. So after much discussion we decided to go with two versions. On the main release Tom did exceptional work to maintain the integrity of our mixes and reproduce the low end as much as possible and still get a decent level, although it’s still nowhere as loud as a lot of modern records. The Audiophile Mastered Version is more true to how the mixes sounded to us in the studio when we were working on the songs. Have a listen, turn up the volume and enjoy the experience!

Mastering Engineer Tom Baker adds:
I believe it was Trent’s idea to master the album two different ways, and to my knowledge it has never been done before.
The standard version is “loud” and more aggressive and has more of a bite or edge to the sound with a tighter low end.
The Audiophile Mastered Version highlights the mixes as they are without compromising the dynamics and low end, and not being concerned about how “loud” the album would be. The goal was to simply allow the mixes to retain the spatial relationship between instruments and the robust, grandiose sound.
 
NOTE: The standard mastered version is in no way inferior to the Audiophile Version - we wouldn’t release something inferior as the default. And vinyl purists rest assured, the vinyl edition was mastered to sound the very best for that format. The Audiophile Version is merely an alternate take on the mastering, which some people will appreciate. It’s meant to give a slightly different experience, not denigrate the standard version. Listen to each and come to your own conclusions.
If you ordered any format of Hesitation Marks from nin.com, you’ll be able to download one or both mastering versions, in whichever formats you prefer (MP3, FLAC, Apple Lossless, and WAV), beginning September 3rd.

nincentral:

Read the full in-depth interview with Trent Reznor from Spin.com

A teaser (featuring previously unreleased music) of the packaging artwork for Nine Inch Nails’ Hesitation Marks, out September third. Artwork by Russell Mills. Art direction/layout by Rob Sheridan.

A sample of the Trent Reznor interview included exclusively with the iTunes Deluxe Edition of Hesitation Marks. Pre-order at ninein.ch/itunesdlx

Download our new song “Copy Of A” free for a limited time from Amazon MP3 (US & UK only right now, more countries coming soon): http://smarturl.it/CopyOfA